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The People Are Not an Image: Vernacular Video After the Arab Spring

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Hardback
Published: November 2020
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BIC Subject: Demonstrations & protest movements
Published By: Bloomsbury
 
Published: 03-Nov-2020
Format: Hardback, 288 pages, 0x0mm
ISBN: 9781788733168
Stock Code: 8733168
Product Description
 
The wave of uprisings and revolutions that swept the Middle East and North Africa between 2010 and 2012 were most vividly transmitted throughout the world not by television or even social media, but in short videos produced by the participants themselves and circulated anonymously on the internet.
In The People Are Not An Image, Snowdon explores this radical shift in revolutionary self-representation, showing that the political consequences of these videos cannot be located without reference to their aesthetic form. Looking at videos from Tunisia, Bahrain, Syria, Libya, and Egypt, Snowdon attends closely to the circumstances of both their production and circulation, drawing on a wide range of historical and theoretical material, to discover what they can tell us about the potential for revolution in our time and the possibilities of video as a genuinely decentralized and vernacular medium.The wave of uprisings and revolutions that swept the Middle East and North Africa between 2010 and 2012 were most vividly transmitted throughout the world not by television or even social media, but in short videos produced by the participants themselves and circulated anonymously on the internet.
In The People Are Not An Image, Snowdon explores this radical shift in revolutionary self-representation, showing that the political consequences of these videos cannot be located without reference to their aesthetic form. Looking at videos from Tunisia, Bahrain, Syria, Libya, and Egypt, Snowdon attends closely to the circumstances of both their production and circulation, drawing on a wide range of historical and theoretical material, to discover what they can tell us about the potential for revolution in our time and the possibilities of video as a genuinely decentralized and vernacular medium.
Peter Snowdon is a filmmaker and researcher. His feature-length film The Uprising, based entirely on YouTube videos from the Arab revolutions, was awarded the Opus Bonum Award for best world documentary at the Jihlava International Documentary Film Festival and has screened at more than 30 festivals around the world. From 1997 to 2000 he lived in Cairo, where he was on the staff of Al-Ahram Weekly, and his writing has appeared in Open Democracy and Le Monde diplomatique. Peter teaches filmmaking in the visual anthropology programme at Leiden University.